Home of Caitlin Imbimbo

Photographer, Videographer & Social Media Coordinator. I like talking about technology and design.
Greater New York City Area

Leave any questions you’d like addressed in the 25mm f/1.4 review video in the comments below!

"Like" ZenDrop Media on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/zendropmedia/

Here we have a compilation of some of the footage I’ve captured using the Panasonic Lumix GH4 and the Panasonic Leica DG 25mm f/1.4. As you can see, depth-of-field is very smooth and noticeable. I will go into further detail in a review in the near future, but the DOF is a bit TOO much for me with this lens, leaving the subject not as sharp as I’d like in low light. As seen in the shot of me, however, given the right lighting, this lens is a star!

Thanks for watching! #YouGuysROCK

My First RAW Edit
Believe it or not, this image is my first edit using RAW format. Just like many others budding photographers, I was afraid that RAW was this foreign language; a breed that required massive amounts of Lightroom knowledge to tame. Today I realized, shooting in RAW actually makes your image like a blank canvas, and that’s an amazing thing to have when editing a photo.
This image was originally shot at f/2.0 using the Panasonic Leica Nocticron 42.5mm lens on a GH4. The exposure was bright, there was a huge spot on my grandmother’s hand and behind her was the reflection of a night stand. After adding a vignette and quite a few adjustment brushes, you have the image above.
Another huge thing I learned when editing this image is how truly non-destructive Lightroom really is. I was anticipating a huge drop in quality when I exported from RAW to JPEG. I would actually go as far as to say I felt my image popped more after being exported, and I suppose that’s due to the fact that RAW files are naturally soft.
Regardless, my point of this post is to urge you to experiment with RAW images. Lightroom is very simple yet very powerful and trust me when I say, your images will thank you.

My First RAW Edit

Believe it or not, this image is my first edit using RAW format. Just like many others budding photographers, I was afraid that RAW was this foreign language; a breed that required massive amounts of Lightroom knowledge to tame. Today I realized, shooting in RAW actually makes your image like a blank canvas, and that’s an amazing thing to have when editing a photo.

This image was originally shot at f/2.0 using the Panasonic Leica Nocticron 42.5mm lens on a GH4. The exposure was bright, there was a huge spot on my grandmother’s hand and behind her was the reflection of a night stand. After adding a vignette and quite a few adjustment brushes, you have the image above.

Another huge thing I learned when editing this image is how truly non-destructive Lightroom really is. I was anticipating a huge drop in quality when I exported from RAW to JPEG. I would actually go as far as to say I felt my image popped more after being exported, and I suppose that’s due to the fact that RAW files are naturally soft.

Regardless, my point of this post is to urge you to experiment with RAW images. Lightroom is very simple yet very powerful and trust me when I say, your images will thank you.

There are few areas of photography I have yet to venture into. Up until about a month ago, one of those areas had been micro four thirds systems. As someone who truly debated purchasing a Panasonic Lumix GH1 before purchasing the Canon T3i in 2012, I have always respected the systems, but never had enough faith in one to leave the Canon ecosystem. When the GH4 was released this year, I didn’t bother to take a second look until I started hearing the buzz on Twitter about a 4K camera with interchangeable lenses that was priced in a consumer range. Having just bought the Canon 70D about a year ago, I wasn’t convinced about taking the plunge. After watching test footage and doing excessive amounts of research (so much that my friends began to comment on it), I came to realize that the Panasonic Lumix GH4 had everything I had been wishing Canon would give me and more.

Sharpness and detail were a constant struggle with my EOS cameras. Without buying an L lens, I felt I was out of luck in that area. With the GH4, I can put an adapted Rokinon lens made for Canon cameras and still retain massive amounts of sharpness. Sharpness comes with the territory in the GH4 world, no matter what glass you’re using.

Another attractive feature that the GH4 had was the ability to mix and match accessories. For example, I was given a Yongnuo flash years ago that never became supported on the 70D. I also have some vintage lenses that my grandfather used. All of these work with the GH4 out of the box. No hacking needed. 

Of course, let’s not forget the pro features like 4K video, 96fps slow motion and focus peaking (to name a few). When you wrap all these pros into one package, it seems difficult to find the cons. So, that is why I took the plunge into micro four thirds cameras and specifically, the GH4. I have zero regrets.

All the footage in this short demo reel was shot with the Lumix G X 12-35mm f/2.8 lens (equivalent of a 24-70). I figured I might as well go big or go home when it came to this camera. As you can see, the myths about depth of field being terrible on a micro four thirds camera are simply myths.

I want to thank you for sticking around for this past year. I know I have been scarce and I appreciate your loyalty. I am looking forward to getting back into YouTube production and covering this camera extensively for you all. If you have any specific GH4 questions, please leave them in the video comments on YouTube and I will respond to as many as I can. I want to answer YOUR questions in the review because my questions have already been answered.

Thanks again,

"ForeverG5"

“ When you come out of the storm, you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what the storm’s all about. ”
Haruki Murakami; Kafka on the Shore
1 of 50
Load More Posts
Sorry, No More Posts
Loading...